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Would you fly on a Boeing 737 Max?

Discussion in 'Randomination' started by SpurMeUp, 12 Mar 2019 at 12:18 AM.

  1. nayenezgani

    nayenezgani Teemu Tainio

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    Only if Einstein is the pilot
     
  2. StephenH

    StephenH Ian Walker

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    Only 1st class.
     
  3. Jon

    Jon Ruel Fox

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    Feck me, was going to read this post. But then decided to wait until it comes out in paperback so I can spread it over a fortnights holiday reading it on the sun lounger.
     
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  4. djp82

    djp82 Gus Poyet

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    Boeing have grounded all the 737 max 8’s . Something from recent crash must of come to light to ground whole fleet.
     
  5. scaramanga

    scaramanga David Ginola Staff Member

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    It's not something new come to light, it's an angle of attack sensor that Boeing already knew was at risk of fault. They've published guidelines to pilots on how to trim against the sensor when it misreads but not all pilots are equal.

    So I'll rephrase my initial answer to "Of course I would, but not on a garbage airline where the pilots don't get/read safety briefings"

    It's also worth noting that the Ethiopian authorities have sent the data recorder to France - the only place in the world less able to provide a balanced opinion of its contents than the US. It seems they've already decided where they want the blame to land.
     
  6. djp82

    djp82 Gus Poyet

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    US or France wherever it goes the cause needs to be found and corrected. Yes as you said they were aware the attack sensor had problems as found after Lion air crash and they are taking steps by developing software to correct it.

    The safety briefing was clearly not enough if sensor is the cause of the accident. And saying it’s a matter of pilots/Airlines would not persuade me to get on it just as it’s a better airline by reputation.
     
  7. scaramanga

    scaramanga David Ginola Staff Member

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    Neither the US nor France are suitable locations for the investigation. Boeing is US based (and a strong lobbyist) and their main competitors are France based (and have their govt in their pockets).

    Anyone wanting an honest and fair investigation would have avoided both.

    The sensor doesn't fail any more than other sensors tend to. This one doesn't have backup, some do. Pilot aircraft familiarisation and acclimatisation is full of what to do when certain sensors give gammy readings - if you want to fly without the risk of pilots missing those readings then you won't be going very far for the next 20 years.
     
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  8. djp82

    djp82 Gus Poyet

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    I’ll take your word for all that. Know nowt about the economics of Boeing and France etc as you’ve pointed out.

    We don’t yet know the cause but the fact they’ve all been grounded is a sign for me anyway that somethings a miss.

    On the last point I hope that’s not the case and pilots are switched on to defective sensor readings but at the same time I’m well aware you take that risk anytime you board a plane.
     
  9. Jon

    Jon Ruel Fox

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    I certainly feel safer boarding one now.

    Now that I know there’s no risk of this absolute flying death trap being allowed to take off!
     
  10. Glenda's Legs

    Glenda's Legs Mitchell Thomas

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    How many people book a flight and know/care which type of aircraft they will be flying on?
    I certainly don’t take any notice, apart from wanting to know the seating configuration for choosing my seats.
     
  11. StephenH

    StephenH Ian Walker

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    I'm counting on this with our latest project. @monkeybarry;)
     
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  12. monkeybarry

    monkeybarry Vedran Corluka

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    Can we get an evil laugh emoji?
     
  13. StephenH

    StephenH Ian Walker

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  14. Jon

    Jon Ruel Fox

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    Robbo, AuroRaman and StephenH like this.
  15. scaramanga

    scaramanga David Ginola Staff Member

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    Daniel-Levy-Laughing.jpg
     
  16. StephenH

    StephenH Ian Walker

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    monkeybarry likes this.
  17. SpurMeUp

    SpurMeUp Johnny Morrison

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    The issues is that Boeing, keen to compete with Airbus, put a lot of effort in developing the existing 737 so arilines would not have to re-train pilots. It was driven by the sales department rather than the safty one. The regulator in the US signed it off as a craft not needing re-training by pilots. So pilots would not have known about the new stability managment system which was new to that model. In both crashes it is likely the pilots were desperatly trying to correct the aircraft dipping its nose, but had no idea that this new stability managment system was fitted. Tragic.
     
  18. scaramanga

    scaramanga David Ginola Staff Member

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    I'm sorry but that post shows a complete lack of understanding of how both the industry and the relevant regulations work.

    Shortly after discovering that the AOA sensor could force trim against the pilot's control, Boeing issued updated training guides to all airlines. If an airline chooses not to take a pilot out of circulation for familiarisation then that's on them (hence my comment about garbage airlines).

    To suggest that a new model of aircraft can be launched without any training or familiarisation at all (no matter how similar to an existing model) is ludicrous - that just doesn't happen.
     
  19. Jon

    Jon Ruel Fox

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    Poor form that posters on this football forum aren’t all certified aviation experts :D;)
     
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  20. Rorschach

    Rorschach Tommy Harmer

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    Or football experts for that matter.
     
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