1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Dear Guest, Please note that adult content is not permitted on this forum. We have had our Google ads disabled due to some posts that were found from some time ago. Please do not post adult content and if you see any already on the forum, please report the post so that we can deal with it. Thanks, scara
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Please read this post: https://www.glory-glory.co.uk/community/threads/fund-raising-for-jeremy-yermiyahu.10542/
    Dismiss Notice

Politics, politics, politics (so long and thanks for all the fish)

Discussion in 'Randomination' started by SpurMeUp, 19 Feb 2019.

  1. SpurMeUp

    SpurMeUp Tom Huddlestone

    Joined:
    5 Feb 2012
    Messages:
    13,759
    Likes Received:
    5,799
    You are right. Sovereignty, a distinctly abstract concept, has been pursued by Boris and he has delivered bucket loads of sovrignity. Has it been at the cost of the economy? According to our government, absolutely. They project around a 4% loss to GDP which is huge. Will you notice the extra sovereignty?
     
  2. scaramanga

    scaramanga Ralph Coates Staff Member

    Joined:
    13 Jan 2012
    Messages:
    29,797
    Likes Received:
    16,980
    I will, yes. Our trade federation will begin lobbying again in the spring to convince the govt there's no reason to apply EU regs to trade with RoW.
     
  3. SpurMeUp

    SpurMeUp Tom Huddlestone

    Joined:
    5 Feb 2012
    Messages:
    13,759
    Likes Received:
    5,799
    Do you currently sell into the EU?
     
  4. SpurMeUp

    SpurMeUp Tom Huddlestone

    Joined:
    5 Feb 2012
    Messages:
    13,759
    Likes Received:
    5,799
    Are these the regulations around toxic chemicals used in manufacture?
     
  5. scaramanga

    scaramanga Ralph Coates Staff Member

    Joined:
    13 Jan 2012
    Messages:
    29,797
    Likes Received:
    16,980
    Yes, most weeks.
     
  6. scaramanga

    scaramanga Ralph Coates Staff Member

    Joined:
    13 Jan 2012
    Messages:
    29,797
    Likes Received:
    16,980
    Nope, it's around non-toxic chemicals used in manufacture.
     
  7. SpurMeUp

    SpurMeUp Tom Huddlestone

    Joined:
    5 Feb 2012
    Messages:
    13,759
    Likes Received:
    5,799
    What makes them banned if not harmful?

    Do you have extra paper work to fill in on exports now? Any rule of origin considerations?


    Sitting on my porcelain throne using glory-glory.co.uk mobile app
     
  8. scaramanga

    scaramanga Ralph Coates Staff Member

    Joined:
    13 Jan 2012
    Messages:
    29,797
    Likes Received:
    16,980
    They're harmful in the same way as bleach is harmful. Drinking it would be really bad for you (and definitely don't inject it) but products it has been used on are perfectly safe.

    We only have to do what we do for RoW, no real hard work at all. The information we have to supply to the freight company is no more onerous than that we had to keep for ECSL returns.
     
  9. SpurMeUp

    SpurMeUp Tom Huddlestone

    Joined:
    5 Feb 2012
    Messages:
    13,759
    Likes Received:
    5,799
    I think HMRC, our government, put the extra bureaucratic export cost at circa £7b pa. With the UK needing various government officials. The 'bleach-like' chemicals is a bit of mystery until you can point to a specific law.

    Which new markets are you expecting to open up as a consequence of allowing these bleach-like substances?
     
  10. scaramanga

    scaramanga Ralph Coates Staff Member

    Joined:
    13 Jan 2012
    Messages:
    29,797
    Likes Received:
    16,980
    The rules were being phased in over the next couple of years, so for us it means keeping the UK/RoW customers we have. So keeping 90+% of our customers.
     
  11. SpurMeUp

    SpurMeUp Tom Huddlestone

    Joined:
    5 Feb 2012
    Messages:
    13,759
    Likes Received:
    5,799
    EU share trading flees London on first day after full Brexit
    Nearly €6bn of dealing rerouted to newly created European hubs and primary exchanges

    London’s financial sector started to feel the full effects of Brexit on the first trading day of 2021 as nearly €6bn of EU share dealing shifted away from the City to facilities in European capitals.

    ----
    What are the implications of this for UK tax revenues?
     
  12. Mikey10

    Mikey10 Ruel Fox

    Joined:
    26 Jul 2016
    Messages:
    3,803
    Likes Received:
    4,223
    Location:
    Dorset (via N Ireland)
    Don’t worry. We’ll make that back in no time now that the £350 million a week side-of-the-bus money is rolling in.
     
    Gilzeantoscore and thfcsteff like this.
  13. Diamond Lights

    Diamond Lights Peter Taylor

    Joined:
    18 Jan 2012
    Messages:
    874
    Likes Received:
    1,137
    Location:
    North Stand
    Given i work in this field... so...

    It's a complicated interconnectedness but basically to transact in certain jurisidictions, you need to have a subsidiary based in that location. There's several reasons why, mainly for regulatory oversight, but also it means that obviously taxed earnings within those jurisdictions are taxed as a subsidiary (not a branch) and therefore the local tax revenue is earned. So, in the UK, subsidiaries are UK based and therefore revenues earned into the UK. You also have to hold capital in those jurisidictions and apply for licences from the local regulators.

    Now however, due to Brexit, all Banks have effectively created major hubs in other locations as EU financial services have had to shift, so we still keep the UK entities. However, banks have now created major hubs elsewhere, so transactions settled via those entities will now have their financial records reviewed outside of UK jurisdiction and taxes earned to those countries. Germany, France for example. The assets and liabilities have moved on the balance sheet over to those locations.

    So yes, we have lost tax revenues into the UK from hubs. Did we lose thousands of workers too? A little bit. Some have shifted abroad, not as many. In some cases we will also lose tax revenue from their earnings but this won't be felt as much to be honest.

    Will London remain a financial hub? Yes. definitely. But i want to be abundantly clear here, banks have shifted hubs and will NOT return those hubs to London. We've put in 3+ years of solid work to get this done, even if passporting agreed in the coming months, no Banks are unwinding again, too much effort has been done to move this stuff.
     
  14. SpurMeUp

    SpurMeUp Tom Huddlestone

    Joined:
    5 Feb 2012
    Messages:
    13,759
    Likes Received:
    5,799
    There is a lot of complex detail. However, the general impacts that we are seeing now were logical and predicted years ago! I am angry at those who told lies to people. Politicians who used Brexit to further careers, and effectively downgraded the UK in the process. They were either incompetent - didn't think there would be losses to the UK - or they were lying. One of the two.

    @scaramanga I did not realise Brexit was so vital to your business! It does not seem to stack up though. You're suggesting 90% of your business was going to be lost because of EU legislation? Amazing that you have only just mentioned this...:confused:
     
  15. scaramanga

    scaramanga Ralph Coates Staff Member

    Joined:
    13 Jan 2012
    Messages:
    29,797
    Likes Received:
    16,980
    It's not an impossible workaround - it won't stop our business. It does mean we'd probably have to move our UK operations overseas. But the clear expectation from our industry groups are that if the govt doesn't repeal the laws, it will offer a dispensation for individual companies that can show harm from it. That wasn't possible within the EU but would be now.
     
  16. scaramanga

    scaramanga Ralph Coates Staff Member

    Joined:
    13 Jan 2012
    Messages:
    29,797
    Likes Received:
    16,980
  17. SpurMeUp

    SpurMeUp Tom Huddlestone

    Joined:
    5 Feb 2012
    Messages:
    13,759
    Likes Received:
    5,799
    Looks interesting. Can you paste it? Or what was that site that unlocked newspaper stories?

    Shame the author made his name and forged his career as an architect of Brexit over 25 odd years. If he’d focused on pedagogy instead we’d be in a better position. Dont think it’s worked out as he dreamt as a school boy. For example:

    Daniel Hannan: “But, to repeat, absolutely nobody is talking about threatening our place in the Single Market.”


    Sitting on my porcelain throne using glory-glory.co.uk mobile app
     
    Last edited: 10 Jan 2021
  18. scaramanga

    scaramanga Ralph Coates Staff Member

    Joined:
    13 Jan 2012
    Messages:
    29,797
    Likes Received:
    16,980
    Sure.

     
    SpurMeUp likes this.
  19. SpurMeUp

    SpurMeUp Tom Huddlestone

    Joined:
    5 Feb 2012
    Messages:
    13,759
    Likes Received:
    5,799
    The lack of innovation in school level education is shockingly bad. Even in classrooms. Hannon has to pander to his right-wing audience and bring in the Unions, and sure there is an element of truth to his criticism. However, this is not a union-created issue. Unions' job is to protect teachers, that is all. If you care to look into how education is run in the UK, far more criticism can be levelled at the Department for Education. A monster of a Ministry. Its too big, too cumbersome, and too powerful. Ironic as the succession of Tory governments have sought to make schools run like little independent businesses. However, they answer solely to the Department for Education now. All 33,000 of them. Where there used to be guidance and support from local authorities, or input from organisations like BECTA (a former technology advice body just for schools), there is now just the Department for Education.

    Why can't the UK Department for Education, be more agile? Why can't it a. look at best practice and quickly provide guidelines on remote learning? b. set up feedback to improve the guidelines and c. plan ahead?

    Schools knew there may well be further lockdowns coming. The Department for Education stuck to government policy and did not entertain the possibility. Hence schools not having laptops for poorer kids etc which the Department for Education promised to provide.

    So a typical Hannon piece then which has some value - identifies how things could and should be improved - but it is naive in its criticism. Neither identifying where the core problems lie or isolating real-world solutions.
     
    Lost Mango and Mikey10 like this.
  20. Mikey10

    Mikey10 Ruel Fox

    Joined:
    26 Jul 2016
    Messages:
    3,803
    Likes Received:
    4,223
    Location:
    Dorset (via N Ireland)
    Easier to blame the ‘lefty’ teaching unions though - despite the fact they have been shown to be right in every aspect of their analysis during this pandemic so far.

    Hanrooster was up to the same thing this morning on Marr and Sophie Ridge - it’s all the public’s fault, guv, nothing to do with the government’s tinkle-poor response since last January.
     

Share This Page