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Why do you support Spurs?

No idea
I know his best mate who was my footy coach
I’ll ask when I next see him


Oh yes please, I always wondered if that was just a mad rumour or not.
Souness was looking to make a statement signing to end the no Catholic rule so it made a bit of sense.
Turned out to be Mo Jo and I can still remember that morning vividly.
 
Oh yes please, I always wondered if that was just a mad rumour or not.
Souness was looking to make a statement signing to end the no Catholic rule so it made a bit of sense.
Turned out to be Mo Jo and I can still remember that morning vividly.
Yeah I remember that
My family was half Celtic half Rangers dependant on my mother’s or fathers side (both granddad were Scottish) and it was a hot topic
I work in Glasgow regularly and even now it still gets talked about
 
Why do you support Spurs?

Been asking myself that for decades.

I don't know what year it was, got taken to a 1-0 game vs Forest by my father and grandfather. Must have been 4 or 5 years old.

Grandfather told me stories of him being taken to Spurs as a kid. With all standing, the adults had to physically shield him and his siblings from the surging crowd. Must have been quite an experience.
 
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Yeah I remember that
My family was half Celtic half Rangers dependant on my mother’s or fathers side (both granddad were Scottish) and it was a hot topic
I work in Glasgow regularly and even now it still gets talked about


I'm the same, father was an orange man, mother's brother was a priest.
Was all good fun, in our family, no real problems thankfully.
 
So my Mum and Dad were not really into football but if pressed my Dad would always look for Spurs results. My uncles on my Mums side were Arsenal supporters and one of them in particular really hated Jews. It stemmed from him being in Palestine while he was in the army when there were a lot of atrocities carried out by the Jews against the british army.
I was too young to understand all this and really started to like Spurs when my sister met her boyfriend (who went on to be her husband) who was a massive Spurs fan. I did write an article about it a couple of years ago. So in 1967 when Spurs won the FA cup, I was truly hooked. A year later my sisters boyfriend took me to WHL for the very first time. A pre season friendly against Glasgow Rangers. That was the start of many trips to WHL with him.
I wrote about that night here- https://www.glory-glory.co.uk/community/threads/my-first-time-at-whl.7538/#post-683183
That will probably give you a better read than this.
COYS

"when there were a lot of atrocities carried out by the Jews against the british army."

You need to read some history and not post drivel like that on here.
 
I'm loving this thread. Although I do seem to have some dust in my eye...

My story is nowhere near as poignant as some. It's mostly luck. Growing up South Asian in Kensal Green, I wasn't exactly sporty...and what I did get from my dad was all about cricket. I vaguely remember going to nearby Lords for Sri Lanka's first Test in England, for example. Must have been 1984, when I was 6. Then the 1986 World Cup happened, and suddenly football was everywhere. Lineker, Shilton...Maradona. I took a bit of an interest, but it didn't go any further. Just as well, given that QPR would have been my local team.

Spring 1987. I was 9 and not doing a lot. I put the TV on and there was FOOTBALL on! The FA Cup final, in fact. A team in blue against a team in white. The team in white had a funny name. And they were winning! Unfortunately they lost in the end, but it was very exciting. I felt sad for the team in white. I decided that they would be my team. Tottenham Hotspur.

The next year we moved to Radlett (well, Shenley really), and the year after that I started secondary school. Suddenly the team you supported mattered. The school was half Jewish, so needless to say there was a large Tottenham contingent, including my new best mate. By the time Italia '90 and then the '91 FA Cup came around, it was sealed. If only I knew what was to come!

It was just a pity that I had to live on the same bloody road as the Arsenal training ground (formerly the UCL Sports Ground, now home to Watford FC) all through the nineties. I made a point of spitting on it whenever we rode past on our bikes. And giving football tourists bad directions. I'm not proud. Well, maybe a little.

It could all have gone so wrong. I could have been a Coventry City supporter, or even more easily a Gooner. With Spurs there's always excitement -- even when we were serving up mid-table dross, we did it with a hint of style, with world class players like Klinsmann and Ginola. And I think that's one of the reasons for supporters of other teams resenting us. Until recently, we haven't been good enough to deserve the column inches we get, and I suppose that rankles.
 
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I'm loving this thread. Although I do seem to have some dust in my eye...

My story is nowhere near as poignant as some. It's mostly luck. Growing up South Asian in Kensal Green, I wasn't exactly sporty...and what I did get from my dad was all about cricket. I vaguely remember going to nearby Lords for Sri Lanka's first Test in England, for example. Must have been 1984, when I was 6. Then the 1986 World Cup happened, and suddenly football was everywhere. Lineker, Shilton...Maradona. I took a bit of an interest, but it didn't go any further. Just as well, given that QPR would have been my local team.

Spring 1987. I was 9 and not doing a lot. I put the TV on and there was FOOTBALL on! A team in blue against a team in white. The team in white had a funny name. And they were winning! Unfortunately they lost in the end, but it was very exciting. I felt sad for the team in white. I decided that they would be my team. Tottenham Hotspur.

The next year we moved to Radlett (well, Shenley really), and the year after that I started secondary school. Suddenly the team you supported mattered. The school was half Jewish, so needless to say there was a large Tottenham contingent, including my new best mate. Come Italia '90 and then the '91 FA Cup, and it was all sealed. If only I knew what was to come!

It was just a pity that I had to live on the same bloody road as the Arsenal training ground (formerly the UCL Sports Ground, now home to Watford FC) all through the nineties. I made a point of spitting on it whenever we rode past on our bikes. And giving football tourists bad directions. I'm not proud. Well, maybe a little.

It could all have gone so wrong. I could have been a Coventry City supporter, or even more easily a Gooner. With Spurs there's always excitement -- even when we've been serving up mid-table dross, we did it with a hint of style, of world class players like Klinsmann. And I think that's one of the reasons for supporters of other teams resenting us. Until recently, we haven't been good enough to deserve the column inches we got, and I suppose that rankles.


I love this, why? I've been to Radlett a few times. Such a small world.
 
Because they're the best club on the fudging planet. My life would be dull without them and the kit is (or was) really nice. Something, something, Gazza... Kanouté.
 
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It was down to my brother. He supported Spurs because all his mates supported Liverpool and United and he wanted someone else. He found Glenn Hoddle. Apparently my granddad was a Spurs fan and attended quite a few games in the 50s but I never met him. My dad was a Liverpool fan albeit not a massive one.

All my mates support Liverpool. I got an awful time of it growing up because they were always better than us but I never once thought about switching teams even as a young kid. Your team is your team for life. And it was good to be different. And in the 80s there was a bit of a swagger and class about us.

It's an amazing thing - football allegiance. I've passed it on to my 7 year old son and he's having the same brick I did coz all his mates support Liverpool and they've got good again. I thought he was wavering but he's staunchly Tottenham now. And he says going to the games with me is his favourite thing in the world to do. It's mine too. I remember the look on his face the first time he stepped into the ground (it was Wembley). It was just a look of sheer amazement and wonder and I could see the steward give me a nod as if to say "I see that look every week and I never get tired of it."

It's a truly beautiful thing that I hope he'll remember going to the games for the rest of his life. Maybe he'll be on here in 20 years posting about his dad who ruined his life by cursing him with Spurs but he wouldn't have it any other way.
 
I'm loving this thread. Although I do seem to have some dust in my eye...

My story is nowhere near as poignant as some. It's mostly luck. Growing up South Asian in Kensal Green, I wasn't exactly sporty...and what I did get from my dad was all about cricket. I vaguely remember going to nearby Lords for Sri Lanka's first Test in England, for example. Must have been 1984, when I was 6. Then the 1986 World Cup happened, and suddenly football was everywhere. Lineker, Shilton...Maradona. I took a bit of an interest, but it didn't go any further. Just as well, given that QPR would have been my local team.

Spring 1987. I was 9 and not doing a lot. I put the TV on and there was FOOTBALL on! The FA Cup final, in fact. A team in blue against a team in white. The team in white had a funny name. And they were winning! Unfortunately they lost in the end, but it was very exciting. I felt sad for the team in white. I decided that they would be my team. Tottenham Hotspur.

Nice post [emoji4][emoji106]

That was the first game I remember in any detail. The first game that really meant something to me. Like gamblers, it’s the loosing that makes you come back for more. I can still feel the pain and injustice of that game!

The FA Cup was an all day build up back then! I watched in my grandparents house, where every year Spurs or not, the FA cup would be on. It might be a sunny day with everyone in the garden. Even if no one was watching - the final would be blaring out.

We must be getting older eh [emoji23]


Sitting on my porcelain throne using glory-glory.co.uk mobile app
 
In 1952 (when I was 8) I switched from a boarding convent in Sussex to one in Mill Hill, North London.

There, at tea-time every Saturday a reverential hush would descend as the wireless was tuned in to Sports Report with the now iconic signature music 'Out of the Blue' (see below) arresting our attention. The whole refectory would become charged with nervous tension ahead of the impending reading of the results.

Roars of glee mixed in with groans of dismay would simultaneously go up as each score was read out, muted for some, louder for others, louder still for Arsenal's but loudest of all for Tottenham's. The convent was roughly equidistant from both Highbury and WHL but it was Tottenham's generosity in providing free admission for certain games that clinched it for me and most of the boys.

So it was that I too soon chimed in with the cheers / groans for the Spurs result, the more so of course by the time I eventually got the chance to make my first trip to WHL - a year or so later in 1953.

I no longer remember which game was my first at WHL, but that hardly matters because in truth we never got to see that much of what was going on. Our carer Mr Twentyman was indifferent to football and would steer us to the back of Shelf where, surrounded by six-footers, we stood little chance.

One game that does stick in the memory however was a year later, when following a long run of defeats our misery was compounded by a 1-4 home defeat to Charlton. By then I'd worked out how to get a better view and recall watching with utter dismay the lob back by our RB, none other than the great Alf Ramsey, to our goalie Ted Ditchburn who had come off his line. The ball sailed straight over the keeper's head for an og and (I think it was) Charlton's third.
 
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My cousin's a Spurs fan (he's ten years older than me), watched the FA cup final (or maybe it was the semi) with him back in 91. I was six, so don't remember much of it, but remember taking to the crest and the name and always associating with it. I think my first season of really following was when Klinsmann joined, yet strangely, the first match I can vividly remember watching whilst screaming in front of the TV was an NLD where Armstrong and Sheringham scored at WHL and we won 2-1. For some reason, I just can't seem to remember having watched any particular matches before that, although I'm certain I did.

Which means the only two trophies I've ever really celebrated as a spurs fan were the 99 league Cup (called in sick on a game I was supposed to play myself, no one on the team believed me) and remember jumping around all alone in my parents apartment.

And 2008, drunk as a sailor crying on the floor in the Spurs pub in Oslo. 12 fudging years ago.

Jesus, it's been a rocky ride. :p
 

Everytime I here that tune takes me back to being on a 127 bus going along the High Road and the hush that fell when the results were read out on someones portable radio. I still dislike listening to most sports on the radio as it's mainly opinions being voiced rather than reporting, the exception being cricket but that's not as good as it was.
 
My cousin's a Spurs fan (he's ten years older than me), watched the FA cup final (or maybe it was the semi) with him back in 91. I was six, so don't remember much of it, but remember taking to the crest and the name and always associating with it. I think my first season of really following was when Klinsmann joined, yet strangely, the first match I can vividly remember watching whilst screaming in front of the TV was an NLD where Armstrong and Sheringham scored at WHL and we won 2-1. For some reason, I just can't seem to remember having watched any particular matches before that, although I'm certain I did.

Which means the only two trophies I've ever really celebrated as a spurs fan were the 99 league Cup (called in sick on a game I was supposed to play myself, no one on the team believed me) and remember jumping around all alone in my parents apartment.

And 2008, drunk as a sailor crying on the floor in the Spurs pub in Oslo. 12 fudging years ago.

Jesus, it's been a rocky ride. :p

You're a disgrace, football is like sex it's much better doing it than watching someone else doing it.
 
A few of us at Primary School were discussing who they supported in the playground. I didn't have any affiliation (my father only cared about cricket). Most of my school friends seems to be Arsenal supporters, so I said Tottenham.
 
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