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Does anyone suffer from mental illness on here?

Discussion in 'Randomination' started by Danishfurniturelover, 24 Oct 2016.

  1. Jordinho

    Jordinho John Cameron Staff Member

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    I can relate to most of this, but particularly the seasonal thing. I went off medication this summer and everything's been fine until the last few weeks. I've been recommended getting one of those lamps in the past, but it was a bit expensive. Just a few hours of outdoor activity at the weekend would help, but it can feel like such a chore at times. It's a bit of a catch 22, to improve my state of mind I have to get out and do stuff I don't feel like doing. Far too easy to stay in your comfort zone, even if you know it's bad for you.
     
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  2. thfcsteff

    thfcsteff Willie Hall

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    Good on you Chich for speaking up. My Dad is mentally ill, it has skipped me but I set out early doors to live a life that would not put me in situations where anxiety could take a grip. Anger is a big issue for many. A couple of my friends have been counseled for it, and sometimes to ties in with depression. I would absolutely speak with someone to find out where the anger comes from, perhaps more importantly what triggers it too, so as you can determine your next steps from there...again, what it reads like to me is a form of depression. StephenH is on course though mate, so good luck and keep talking...
     
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  3. SteveAWOL

    SteveAWOL Andy Thompson

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    I can also relate to the anxiety and SAD issues.

    My GP put me on Amitriptyline a few months ago to treat the anxiety / migraines and whilst it's taken the edge off (like yourself) I just feel kinda numb. The pros just about outweigh the cons for me currently but I might ask to try something else in due course.

    A blood test showed that I had a Vitamin D deficiency a few years back; i was informed that it is quite common in people of Asian heritage living far from the equator, as apparently our skin doesn't convert the UVB from sunshine into vitamin D as readily as Caucasians or Afro-Caribbeans.

    I was given a high dose vitamin D injection which perked me up a treat but when I returned for a follow up, 6 months later, I was informed it was no longer being manufactured; so I was prescribed tablets instead.

    A subsequent blood test showed that my vitamin D levels were within normal parameters but I continue to take the supplements during the winter months, as recommended by my GP, which seems to have alleviated the S.A.D. somewhat. A couple of my relatives swear by the light boxes instead though.
     
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  4. SpurMeUp

    SpurMeUp Andy Thompson

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    @gutterboy Asperges is associated with anger and flare ups.

    Autism is fascinating. There is a little bit in all of us. And its very much part of a successful gene pool. Many inventors, successful business people who think outside the box or have attention to detail etc are Aspergers.

    Re. Depression I think it's something like the third biggest killer of men! Quite crazy. It's also a growing disease.

    Nice to see some support on here. Some of my work is related to supporting disabled students including those with Aspergers and Mental health difficulties. There are some awesome videos that are worth watching. Will post links later.


    Sitting on my porcelain throne using glory-glory.co.uk mobile app
     
    milo likes this.
  5. johnola

    johnola Teemu Tainio

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    Tiredness/exhaustion is when my emotions start getting a bit out of hand.

    Whilst I think that is normal I reckon there are lots of blokes who break their tethers by trying to do too much.

    .. And then if you have a condition that causes mania, even in a subtle way like many Asperger sufferers, then you are going to get a deeper energy deficit.

    So managing your bodies energy effectively is important to all of us and particularly so if you have a condition.

    So whilst fighting SAD with exercise might be effective, just remember to rest plenty too.
     
  6. milo

    milo Jack L. Jones

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    Absolutely, I've seen the case made that it is exaggerated male characteristics.
     
    SpurMeUp likes this.
  7. SpurMeUp

    SpurMeUp Andy Thompson

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    Its a bit lengthy, and not the most entertaining, but this gives a good idea of what Autism is and what we understand. Skip the intro http://royalsociety.tv/rsPlayer.aspx?presentationid=1007 There is such a range within Autism, from people who are non-verbal, can't talk, rocking etc, to those who you wouldn't notice anything but are maybe a little awkward socially - aren't we all at times - and have Aspergers.

    This lady is amazing


    When a colleague took his own life, out of the blue, it was a massive shock. Such a nice guy and was always fine at work, it was when he went home things were difficult. At the end he had been sleeping in his car. Sadly we didn't know this. Watching a number of documentaries on depression on YouTube was helpful. Can help you understand why, and how depression can be uncontrollable. https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=depression I can't remember the US one I watched about 1 hour long with people sharing their experiences but it was amazing.

    More entertaining, here's a successful business man with Bi-Polar. He's made fortunes and then blown them! So he now has his money unavailable to himself, in case he has an episode. This film show his brilliance and serious mental health problems! It's a roller coaster:
     
    Last edited: 27 Oct 2016
    SteveAWOL, thfcsteff and Rorschach like this.
  8. milo

    milo Jack L. Jones

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    Thanks.

    I'm fairly familiar with autism and people on the autistic spectrum and have done a fair bit of volunteering with people with special needs in the past.
     
  9. Yermiyahu

    Yermiyahu Scott Parker

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    Everybody knows this is nowhere.
    I've had a few issues with depression and especially anxiety. I take an anti depression medication each day and try to make sure I keep my blood sugar levels under control as I have type 2 diabetes.I also take moderate exercise. In used to suffer from seasonal affective disorder, but a move from London to Florida cured that. I get out in the sun at least twenty minutess day with my shirt off. I'd advise the OP to take decisive action now. The right changes and you will feel a whole lot better. Leave it and you might , as I did, do and say some things that you end up really regretting, and that would be a great shame.
     
  10. LemonadeMoney

    LemonadeMoney Les Ferdinand

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    www.glory-glory.co.uk?
     
  11. parklane1

    parklane1 Terry Dyson

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    When i was 21 i really hit the being depressed button and after a while the quack gave me anti- depression tablets and said i have to take them. It was the worst decision i ever made it ended up with me staring into a mirror and thinking about ending it all thankfully i resisted the urge to do that and threw the tablets down the toilet.

    I really believe the tablets made me worse and although i still have bad days i have got through them, it does help to have a strong will and i am lucky enough to have that within me. The biggest problem i have now is anger, i feel that i am getting worse with age ( which from what i am told is usual).

    My old lady helps to keep me calm but i struggle when i am out on my own.
     
  12. milo

    milo Jack L. Jones

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    I was going to say that "which is why I feel so at home here" but then thought better of it
     
  13. PochettinoPochettinoPochettino

    PochettinoPochettinoPochettino Serge Aurier

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    I suffer from anxiety and since 18 I have suffered from Hyperhydrosis which means I sweated excessively, especially in meetings or in front of people, basically any social event.

    It cripled my life, every day was a challenge. I would drink in situations to calm me down and it would be fine but it wasn't the answer.

    If i got nervous for example if a girl on the train made eye contact with me I would blush and then sweat profusely on the face. This was the most embarrassing thing in my life and I was so ashamed about it. There were days when's I thought that life wasn't that great but I had a good family and friends (although they were the ones who took the tinkle out of the situation all the time).

    I literally had no control over it. The anxiety would come at any moment.

    There was a trigger in my brain that switched and I had no control over it, once that switch went the sweats came instantly. I would always find excuses to leave the pub or go outside for a fag, or mid conversation just say I need the toilet.

    I still suffer today but to cut a long story short I had an operation called ETS surgery which is the last resort to try and solve this. I had it in 2012 and it was the best thing I could have had. They basically cut the sweat glands (easiest way of explaining it) above the chest and it stops all sweating from neck upwards, and it changed my life. There could have been complications from it so anyone who has this problem and is thinking of it it really is a drastic measure to do.

    from this I now sweat profusely on my chest back thigh and legs (it's called compensatory sweating) and when I eat most foods like chips or salty, spicy things, sometimes even apples I can sweat on the face, that is called gustatory sweating.

    This changed my life as I no longer sweat or blush on my Face in normal time every day circumstances but the anxiety is still there, albeit I'd say it's gone from 95% to around 25%. This has made me so much more confident, and has allowed me to enjoy life.

    I know that deep down it is a mental problem as well as a physical problem that I have and the surgery was my only solution after trying many things. What I didn't try though was counselling or hypnotherapy for example which may have helped.

    I am now a completely changed person as I was always outgoing but had the social problems. Now I can have a meeting or go into a pub and not need to be tinkled before. Sounds silly but that was literally a challenge in itself for me before this in 2012.

    I get phantom sweats on my face where I still think I'm sweating, but I'm not.

    I have to choose my clothes carefully as light greys and light blues are a no no, and in the summer I can sweat loads on my back chest legs and thighs, but it's something I've come to terms with and least it's not on my face anymore.

    This is the most I have written ever about this problem or mental health issue of mine, some people I know in my life know about this operation I had, whilst many in my life and my work don't but I'm not ashamed about what I have had done, I'm happy to talk about it.
     
    Last edited: 27 Oct 2016
  14. thfcsteff

    thfcsteff Willie Hall

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    We are dealing with a pretty big issue with my daughter - trying to determine the exact diagnosis as we don't want to get it wrong, but might be a bi-polar situation. She is very smart and very self-aware, and we as a family are very very communicative (depression runs in my wife's entire family and my Dad has schizophrenia). My son has none of it and it skipped me as well (although I have bouts of irascibility as we all do ha!)...but I have to admit, this is a very very heavy time and I am utilizing every aspect of my self de-stressing techniques right now.
     
  15. Thebarbarian

    Thebarbarian Nicola Berti

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    This is a great thread, good to see so many of you opening up about this. It is the 1st anniversary of my friend's 17 year-old son taking his own life this Tuesday and the 2nd anniversary last week of another friend's 21 year old son taking his life. Male suicide in 15-40 year olds is the biggest killer of men in Australia at the moment and there is a great campaign gaining momentum called "Itain'tweaktospeak" from a charity called Livin. My friend whose 17 year old died is a big supporter of this charity and does a lot of work with schools and particularly sports clubs (son was a rugby league player) and it is astonishing how many of these kids have issues ranging from anxiety through to more complicated mental health issues.

    I am not proud to say that a few years ago on this very forum I made some flippant comments about people using stress/mental health as an excuse for their own shortcomings or failings, and whilst I believe there are some people who will utilise any situation for financial gain (stress leave from work etc) I am now much more aware of how real this is and how widespread it has become. I don't believe I have ever been "clinically" depressed but have had instances in my life where I have been so low (deaths in family, problems in relationships, unfairly dismissed from a job) that the thoughts briefly crossed my mind of what was best for me, keep going or give up. I think I am lucky in that I was able to "pull through it" and return to a space that I was comfortable in and actually push me forward in a positive way. I now understand that wasn't because I was just telling myself to "toughen up" which is what I think many young males have drummed into them, but I was lucky that things weren't that dark that it kept me down.

    I feel for anyone, particularly any of you who have opened up about it, as I am probably a good example of someone who didn't understand and didn't listen. I am now very aware of how important it is and I actively try to engage with anyone who I feel needs to talk (including my teenage daughter who is at the most vulnerable age), and also participate in the Livin charity movement.

    As it's motto says it Ain't Weak To Speak

    this is the strongest message I think we need to send to young people today and as I have learnt we need to be ready to listen.

    Good luck to all of you.
     
  16. JPBB

    JPBB Sean Davis

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    Why Aspergers? It's insulting to those with Aspergers that the behaviour you describe should be seen as a symptom or typical.

    I would start by working out why I was so angry? EFT worked best for me. But there are many other suggestions on here including medication which could work for you. I guess you will pays your money and you takes your chance.

    What I would say is have an open mind, a man or woman in a white coat is not always right, it is your mental health. It is your choice. And there are many options. Trust your instincts.

    And also mental health goes up and down. You can recover.

    Good luck.

    **Edit by scaramanga**

    I've approved this, but I'd like to add the caveat that the man/woman in the white coat is by far the most likely to be right, as they are the ones with all of the years of training and expertise.

    Ignore them at your own risk
     
    Last edited by a moderator: 29 Oct 2016
  17. Bullet

    Bullet Steffen Freund

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    Thanks, interesting. Everyone should watch the first 6 minutes of that. Scary how quickly one can descend into drilling ones own head open
     
  18. Hotshot-Tottenham

    Hotshot-Tottenham Chris Armstrong

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    I am experiencing a close family member suffering with mental illness.

    It's been diagnosed as a psychotic disorder a couple of years back, but there was a run up period of about three years when, looking back, it was clearly manifesting itself.

    It began with thoughts of being bullied which were triggered by a stressful event. It continued with ever more detailed and eventually outlandish claims of persecution, stalking and the convoluted linking of events and people that would lead to obsessive thoughts and compulsions.

    Eventually the illness expressed itself in full blown auditory and visual hallucinations and paranoid delusions. As a family we were aware of what was happening but didn't know how to deal with the situation. We tried to reassure, comfort and console but it's since become apparent to me that you cannot talk rationally to someone who is irrational. It's a different language. I cannot tell you how frightening it is to see and hear a loved one verbally and physically responding to a malevolent voice in their head.

    After a brief disappearance and subsequently locking themselves in the house, we got to crisis point and they were sectioned and hospitalised. This lasted a few weeks and seemed to release the pressure, but the aftercare was almost non-existent so the spiral began again.

    After another year of trying to head it off and trying to get help, we reached breaking point again. This time we avoided hospital on the pure technicality that the crisis came on a Friday night and the hospital mental health assessor (who is needed for sectioning) wasn't available.

    However, the care was much better this time, with daily visits from the crisis team for weeks on end, and now, some months on, weekly appointments, variously with psychiatrists, psychologists and therapists. The close care and talking helps, as does the consistent taking of antipsychotic medication and an anti-anxiety drug.

    I guess talking about it helps me. For a long time no-one knew but people suspected something was wrong. There's a catch 22 in needing help but wanting to respect someone's privacy. Since talking about it, friends and family have been very understanding. It probably filled in some blanks for them.

    I would also say that if you recognise any of the symptoms I've mentioned in a loved one, seek help now, not later. It doesn't go away on its own. You can't talk them around. The longer it is left the higher the chance of permanent damage. Something like this is devastating for the person involved and to their relationships.

    It's an extremely difficult subject to broach, not least because the sufferer often has no idea they are ill. They lack insight, and an 'accusation' of illness can very much play into their paranoia, making you an enemy and harming communication.

    If you can't raise it like we couldn't, speak to your GP, any of the mental health charities or the sufferer's GP. Find a way to get the system involved. It will be difficult, but it's better than the alternative.

    And if you find yourself classed as a carer, make sure you get help and support too.

    Good luck to all those and their families who are experiencing mental illness.
     
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  19. Danishfurniturelover

    Danishfurniturelover the prettiest spice girl

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    The is a show on channel 5 this week with Frank Bruno that will be worth watching, think it is tuesday night, all about his struggles. Also that Chris Packham from Autumn watch has also "come out with mental health problems" so it is quite interesting seeing how people react and live their life.

    I am feeling a little better and we had a succesful weekend, but the is always the worry I might go again. We are going to see the GP next week.
     
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  20. thfcsteff

    thfcsteff Willie Hall

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    Mate...good luck with the GP, but one thing I would also say is perhaps for you and your missus to make sure you don't let them simply guide you, and to make sure they refer to you a clinical psychologist too. The diagnosis will be vital, and if it is correctly achieved, your life will be much, much easier. I saw my wife struggle before she got the right diagnosis a decade ago, and since then it has been a different thing. She still gets down sometimes, but critically, she knows it's a part of life and that can she get back up fairly quickly like most of us. She doesn't feel trapped. We are hoping our daughter's acute anxiety, which has gone on for several years and which we dealt with non-medicinally, can be diagnosed with an accurate treatment program which allows her the same.

    Brilliant you started this thread. Hope the cycling is going well and helping you too.
     
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